Critical Injuries

Adventuring is dangerous buisness, and anyone that has been an adventurer will tell you so. anyone crossing blades with an opponent can be at risk of losing an eye if luck is against them.

The different types of injuries you get depends upon three things. The type of damage you recieve, the amount of damage you recieve, and luck. Anyone is under the risk of recieving critical injuries, even monsters. You roll for injuries upon a cuccessful critical hit

When a crit is rolled, after seeing if it’s confirmed or not, roll a D20, and add approperiate bonuses and penalties:
+2 if the crit is confirmed
+ half BAB for a weapon of any type
+ half caster level for a spell of any type
+ STR if the weapon is slashing or bludgeoning
+ DEX if the weapon is piercing (any bow/crossbow uses DEX, even if it uses hammerheads, for example)
+ relevant spellcasting ability score modifier
+1 for relevant feats (wpn focus, wpn specialization, greater wpn focus, greater wpn specializiation, wpn finesse, spell focus, spell penetration
+2 for metamagic that deals more damage than normal spells
+1 if charging
+1 for every enchantment bonus on the weapon (spells cast through a magic implement like a staff also applies)
+1 for a 2-handed melee weapon
-2 for an improvised weapon
-1 for every enchantment bonus of the defenders armor (only armor, not shields)
-1 if the defender uses a light shield
-2 if the defender is using a heavy shield
-4 if the defender is using a tower shield
-1 for defender feats as applied (dodge (when targeted at you), armor/shield specialization, two-weapon defense, combat expertize)
-x for situatuional penalties (like slippery ground or uneven footing, at the DM’s digression)
Treat this as a normal skill roll in D&D, and the target DC is 15 + HD of target.

When a successful critical injury is scored, roll on the following table to see what happened.
| Damage | block | None | Minor | Medium | great | catastrophic |
| 1 – 9 | 1 – 10 | 11 – 75 | 76 – 95 | 96 – 100 | N/A | N/A |
| 10 – 19 | 1 – 10 | 11 – 50 | 51 – 85 | 86 – 100 | N/A | N/A |
| 20 – 29 | 1 – 10 | 11 – 30 | 31 – 70 | 71 – 94 | 95 – 100 | N/A |
| 30 – 39 | 1 – 10 | 11 – 20 | 21 – 45 | 46 – 80 | 81 – 100 | N/A |
| 40 – 49 | 1 – 10 | 11 – 15 | 16 – 30 | 31 – 70 | 71 – 100 | N/A |
| 50+ | 1 – 10 | N/A | 11 – 20 | 21 – 65 | 66 – 100 | N/A |

For example, if you deal 8 points of damage, you have to roll at least 76 to deal a critical injury at all. But if you roll a whopping 40 points of damage, a 76 means a great injury has happened.

Damage This is the amount of damage you dealt with the critical injury
Block If you roll the d100 and get this, the attack will deal half damage (rounded down) to the creature. The rest of the damage will be delivered to the armor, shield or weapon of the creature (attacker’s choice). Damage will effect the item as normal, if the creature has no equipped items in these slots, this will just be a counted as a normal critical hit.
None If you roll the d100 and get this, no injury is dealt with this attack.
Minor This means that you dealt a minor injury with your attack
Medium This means that you dealt a medium injury with your attack
Great This means that you dealt a great injury with your attack

If a character is brought from positive HP to somewhere between -10 to -19, the attacker rolls on the injury chart as if he dealt (31 + damage dealt) on the critical injury roll, even if he did not roll an injury. If a character is brought below -9 from positive on an attack that was a critical injury, a catastrophic injury has occured. (immediate healing will prevent -10 or below from happening at all, as per normal rules, and if so, a roll will not be made)
Character dies at -20 HP

A character that is brought to somewhere between -1 to -9 falls unconcious and rolls for that as normal rules. A character that after that gets to -10 and below doesn’t die, but he starts bleeding out. Whenever a character that has -10 or worse, but is not dead yet, and has his turn, he will immediately be affected with ‘minor bleedout’ injury and take two damage. He will still die if he reaches -20 or worse.

Now for the types of injuries you deal. After you have made how bad an injury you deal, let’s see what kind of injury you deal based on the weapon type.

Bludgeoning weapons displace a finger or give you a concussion as a minor injury. It can Break ribs, or smash an arm out of it’s socket as a medium injury. It can break an arm/leg or break the ribcage as a great injury. It can crack a skull or fracture the spine as a catastrophic injury.

Piercing weapons can pierce through the shoulder or cut the arm/leg as a minor injury. It can pierce into the stomach or into the eye as a medium injury. It can pierce into the chest or into the throat as a great injury. It can puncture the lung or cut into the head as a catastrophic injury.

Slashing weapons can cut off a nerve or cut into the arm/leg as a minor injury. It can slash the head or cut a finger off as a medium injury. It can cut muscles or do a deep gash as a great injury. It can cut the eyes out or cut an arm/leg off as a catastrophic injury.

Magic attacks works differently when they deal critical injuries. Due to the huge number of magical attacks, numerouis magical energy types and limitless potential of magic, there is no list for different effects when it happens. Instead, the magical injuries are just listed as ‘minor’, ‘medium’, ‘great’ and ‘catastrophic’ magical injury. All effects of magical injuries stack with eachother, and they cannot be healed by normal means.

And now an explanation for what every injury does. Note that ‘normal healing magic’ implies any healing magic that regains hit points, but does not grow back lost limbs or the like. Any of these injuries can be cured with more powerful healing magic.

Concussion the bludgeoning weapon hit the head of the victim enough to give him mild blunt trauma, he will feel disoriented and nauseated for some time, but he should be lucky, it could be much worse. The victim will be dazed for 1d3 rounds after recieving this injury, and is also sickened for 2 days. Normal healing magic fixes this injury.

Dislocated finger the bludgeoning weapon hit and the finger got bent so that it stays straight up, how odd… also painful. Roll a d2 to see which hand got hurt (if a shield is equipped, it is always the shield hand). Any attack done with a hand that has a displaced finger has -1 penalty to attack, and any spells with a somatic component cannot be cast. A heal DC check of 15 fixes this as a standard action. Normal healing magic does not fix this injury.

Cut shoulder The piercing weapon got straight through the shoulder, but luckily it didn’t mess up any bones. You are bleeding and takes 1 point of damage for every 2 levels of the character , every turn he uses a standard action. Any source of healing or a heal DC 15 checks stops the bleeding.

Cut arm/leg The piercing/slashing weapon cut into the arm or the leg (attacker’s choice), into the muscle and that hurts alot. If it was cut into the arm, the victim gets a -1 penalty to attack, and if it was cut into the leg, the victim loses two points of dexterity bonus to AC (if any). Normal healing magic fixes this injury.

Cut nerve The slashing weapon just happened to cut into a specific nervepoint… Strange, it doesn’t hurt at all. The victim cannot put as much strength into his blows as he could earlier, and it feels strange. The victim loses 1 point of strength bonus damage (if any) to his attacks. Normal healing magic fixes this injury.

Broken ribs The bludgeoning weapon broke a few of the ribs, breathing and generally moving in general hurts like hell. Roll 1d3+1 to see how many ribs broke, and Lose 1 point of constitution for each rib broken. This penalty will be removed after 3d10 days (the bone isn’t healed by then, but it doesn’t hurt as much) (any day spent without fighting or strenous activity counts as two days for the purpose of counting down the time until the rib is healed) normal healing magic does not fix this injury

Displaced Shoulder The bludgeoning weapon hit hard enough to force the arm out of it’s socket. In addition to hurting like a MF, that arm cannot be moved. (roll a d2. On a 1, it was the weapon arm) The arm immediately goes limp and drops anything it was holding ((Any weapon used in the non-weapon arm will face the same penalties as it would being the off-hand from two-weapon fighting)). This can be fixed as a full-round action Heal Check DC 20 (the Victim cannot perform this check, nor can he do anything in his turn when he is being helped with a heal check, not even delay his turn. his turn will effectively be skipped) Any spells that requires somatic components cannot be performed with a displaced shoulder. Normal healing magic does not fix this injury

Pierced stomach The piercing weapon got into the stomach and only by a stroke of luck it didn’t mess up any organs. The bleeding is severe, and the victim loses 2 HP at the start of his rounds (this will stack with losing HP if he is also dying) He also loses 1d4 points of constitution (if this brings his CON score to 0, he will die). This can be healed by a heal check DC 20, which will take away 1 point of ongoing damage. Healing magic takes away one point of ongoing damage for every 5 HP healed. The CON damage isn’t healed by usual means of restoring stat damage, but it will be restored to normal whenever the target has recieved at least 20 HP worth of healing magic from the point of injury.

Pierced eye The piercing weapon happened to cut into the eye, and the victim is now and forever blind on that eye. The victim is flat-footed for the end of his next 2 turns and dazed until the end of his next turn. Any spot check has it’s wisdom modifier cut in half (if the WIS mod is 1, it get’s turned to 0). Normal healing magic cannot fix this injury

Slashed head The slashing weapon cuts into the head, but luckily it merely scratched the skull, altough he bleeds like crazy. The victim will fall unconcious at the start of (his Constitution score 1/4, rounded down) turn. Due to a lot of blood getting in his eyes, he gets a -2 to attack rolls and AC at the start of every turn,, this penalty stacks with itself. The victim can take a standard action to wipe the blood out of his face and negate all the penalties he has gotten up to this point, this action does not provoke an attack of opportunity. Normal healing magic fixes this injury (but it does not take away any penalty to attack or defense caused by the blood, it still needs to be wiped)

Cut finger The slashing weapon cuts off the victim’s finger. Roll a d2 to see which hand got attacked (if the target was holding a shield, it is always the shield hand) The victim has a -2 to attack with any weapon held in this hand, and -2 to shield bonus for any shield held in this hand (this also includes two-weapon defense) Any spells with a somatic component can’t be performed with this hand. Any skill check that uses this hand get’s cut in half. This injury cannot be fixed with normal healing magic.

Broken arm/leg The bludgeoning weapon attacked hard enough to break the arm/leg (attacker’s choice). If the arm was broken, the attacker takes a -2 penalty to attacks (regardless of which arm broke) and cannot use any two-handed weapon without suffering an additional -2 penalty. Any skills that requires that arms or hands use will halve the check roll (but not the skill bonuses). If the leg was broken, the victim’s speed is halved and he suffers a -2 point of dexterity bonus to AC (even if he doesn’t have one, which puts it to a negative) Any skill check where the leg is required will halve the check roll (but not the skill bonuses). This injury lasts for 15d10 days (any day spent without fighting or strenous activity counts as two days for the purpose of counting down the time until the bone is healed). Normal healing magic does not fix this injury

Broken Ribcage The bludgeoning weapon hit in it’s victims body so greatly that it broke evry single rib in the victim’s body. The victim loses 1d4 points of strength, 1d6 points of dexterity and 2d6 points of constitution (if any score is brought to 0 by this, the character dies). The character is stunned for one round and his encumberance load is treated as if he is one size category smaller (this does not apply to anything other than how much he can carry, but if a weapon gets to heavy for him because of this, it would apply). The victim is dazed for the rest of the encounter. Any healing magic would take away the penalties of encumberance load, stunned and dazed. For every 10 HP healed by healing magic, one point of ability score damage can be healed (in the order of con – str – dex) up to half damage, the rest of the ability score damage can’t be healed by normal healing magic. These penalties will be removed after 5d10 days (the bone isn’t healed by then, but it doesn’t hurt as much) (any day spent without fighting or strenous activity counts as two days for the purpose of counting down the time until the rib is healed)

Pierced chest The piercing weapon stuck inside the victim’s chest, and punctured something important. The victim takes 4d4 constitution damage (if this brings his CON score to 0, he will die). Due to massive bloodloss, the victim takes 8 ongoing damage. Healing magic takes away one point of ongoing damage for every 5 HP healed. If the ongoing damage has been negated by healing magic, the victim regains half of his lost constitution points, the rest cannot be healed by normal healing magic.

Pierced throat The piercing weapon punctured the victims throat, and the bloodloss would be a problem if it wasn’t for the fact that the victim drowns in the blood in his lungs. The victim dies within (constitution modifier + 1 round). Normal healing magic fixes this injury, but it has to heal at least heal half of the amount of damage the victim sustained.

Cut Muscle The slashing weapon cut deep into an arm or a leg (the attacker’s choice) and cuts deep into the muscles, slashing them up. The arm or leg will effectively be completely useless (same penalties as a cut off arm/leg) but it will still be there. The victim takes an ongoing 5 damage from the very deep cut too. If healing magic is performed, for every 10 HP, the victim can remove 1 ongoing damage. When all ongoing damage has been healed up, the victim regains use of that limb, but it will be very weak for the rest of the day (-2 to attacks made with that arm, -1 to AC if a shield is equipped with that arm, -10 to speed if it was a leg)

Deep Gash The slashing weapon cuts a deep wound into the wrist of the victim, or the inner thigh, or anyother place where blood flows easily, and the victim gets a massive bloodloss. The victim loses 10 hit points every round, and he loses 2 HP for every move action, and 5 HP for every standard action he takes. If the victim starts dying, the HP loss at the start of it’s turn is reduced to 5. For every 3 points of HP healed by healing magic, the ongoing damage is reduced by 1. A full-round action Heal check with the DC 25 stops the ongoing damage, but it will start again if the victim takes a move or a standard action. Normal healing magic fices this injury, and when the ongoing damage is reduced to 0, the victim can use actions without taking damage.

Cracked skull The bludgeoning weapon hit the victim’s head and cracked the cranium. The victim is stunned for his next turn and sickened for 24 hours. The victim loses 1d4 points of every ability score except Strength. If the victim rests for 50 days, he regains all of his lost constitution points. If fixed with healing magic, any penalties dissapear. This injury cannot be fixed with normal healing magic.

Fractured spine The bludgeoning weapon hits so hard that the victims spinal cord got cracked. The victim needs to succeed on a DC 20 fortitude and will save or fall prone. If the victim falls prone, it is also dazed for one round. The victim is flat-footed and staggered for the rest of his life. Normal healing magic does not fix this injury

Punctured Lung The piercing weapon cut into the lung of the victim and he is just lucky to be alive. Unfortunately, the lung punctured is never going to work again and is permanently fatigued. The victim need 10 hours of sleep to get a complete rest, and anything that would make him get fatigued, instead makes him exhausted. The victim gets exhausted more easily than other people.

Cut Head The piercing weapon hit the victim’s head and pierced the skull. If the weapon just got a few millimeters further in, death or a vegetable state would have been the result. The victim loses 1d4 of every ability score except strength permanently. This injury cannot be fixed with normal healing magic.

Slashed eyes The slashing weapon cut into, or cut out the eyes of the victim. The victim is now blind for the rest of his life, and shaken for 1 round. The victim will have to succeed on a will save DC 20 to stop being shakened. If the will save fails by 10 or more, he will start cowering until he can succeed on a will save DC 20 (at which point he will be shakened again and will keep having to roll will saves, but will no longer start cowering if it fails). Normal healing magic does not fix this injury.

Lost limb The slashing weapon cut off an arm or a leg off the victim (the attacker gets to choose). The victim is dazed for one round. If an arm got cut off, roll a d2 to see which arm it was (if the victim was holding a shield, it is always the shield arm). That arm is unuseable forever and obviously no attack or shield bonus works with it. If a leg was cut off, the victim will have to succeed on a fortitude and reflex save DC 20 or fall prone. The victim has his speed lowered by 3/4, and every time he is attacked in combat he will have to succeed on a balance check DC 10 + the attackers attack bonus or fall prone after the attacks resolve (only one check is made per turn, even if the attack has multiple attacks). The victim cannot perform any skill where he needs just the lost limb to function, and any skill that requires more than that limb (like climbing or swimming) will be cut in half after the check has been made. The victim that loses a limb will take a fortitude check DC 15 at the start of every turn, and for every time the check succeeds, the DC will increase by 1 for the next round. A failed fortitude check means that the victim lost too much blood, and is now at 0 HP and dying. Normal healing magic prevents the fortitude checks, but only if the amount healed is at least half of the amount of damage the victim recieved. Normal healing magic does not fix this injury.

Minor Magical Injury The magic force seeped into the defenders skin, and any elemental type (if any) greatly injured him. The defender has a -1 to attacks, – 1d6 SR, and takes 5 extra points of damage from the caster, when the caster uses a spell of the same damage type. The defender needs to succeed a DC 15 fortitude check* or be dazed for 1 round. This effect last until the end of the battle

Medium Magical Injury The magic force caused a miniature magic eruption within the target, causing the weave of magic to explode in the ethereal realm around his body. The subject loses 10 SR, and gets no SR at all against the attacker’s magical attacks. If the spell had an energy type, target loses any resistance (if any) against that energy type, now has a weakness of that energy type vs the caster that caused it. The target gets a -3 to attacks and saves, and is shakened only against the caster (if he attacks anyone else, he does not have the shakened effect). He needs to succeed a DC 20 fortitude check* or be stunned for one round. These effects last until the end of the day

Great Magical Injury The magic literally turns part of the target’s innards inside out due to the immense magical force that is forced upon the body. Luckily, the effect isn’t as lethal as it sounds, since the effect of magic is change, rather than brutal distortion, and the body can go back to it’s normal state soon enough. Nevertheless, the target takes a -5 to attacks, saves and skill checks. If the attack dealt elemental damage, the target loses any resistance bonus against that element type, and now has weakess to it. The target will be counted as having weakness to any elemental type vs the caster. The target will have to succeed a DC 20 will save to be able to bring himself to attack, or even move in a way that would bring him closer to the caster. The target loses 20 SR, and has no SR at all vs the caster. The target is shakened and needs to succeed a DC 20 + spell level fortitude check* or be paralyzed for one round. these effects last for 1d6 days.

  • = If the spell would allow for a different check to be made (like reflex vs a fireball for example, that check is used instead)

Critical Injuries

The Platinum Palace Dartanous